Celery root is a good source of vitamin B-complex, vitamin C, and vitamin K, as well as anti-inflammatory antioxidants that help reduce inflammation. Additionally, it has a lot of dietary fiber, which supports the health of the intestines and the heart. Additionally, it contains essential minerals, including potassium, phosphorus, and magnesium.

Celery root, also known as celeriac, is just what its name claims it to be: the root of the celery plant. This ugly brown hairball of a vegetable has a mild, celery-like flavor with a starchy, rather potato-like texture. It’s a surprising but winning combination. With “root” in its name, celery root is a root vegetable.

When picking out celery root to eat, look for firm tubers without fleshy spots or discolorations. Smaller roots taste better, while more extensive roots are woodier and more suitable for roasting or long stewing. Celery root can be used in any recipe that calls for celery and a variety of others. It can be stored in the fridge in a brown paper bag with stems trimmed approximately one week before use. Celery root can be used in any recipe that calls for celery and a variety of others. It can be stored in the fridge in a brown paper bag with stems trimmed approximately one week before use.

What can I make with celery root?

Are you missing your breakfast hash browns? Do not be alarmed; celery root is here! Heat one tablespoon of olive oil over medium heat in a frying pan. Grind the celery root after peeling it with a cheese grater or food processor. Place it in the pan and cook until it is soft and beginning to brown. Season it with salt and pepper for a great, substantial meal, and serve it with your eggs.

Celery root that has been cooked has a smooth, creamy texture. Rinse and peel two to three medium celery root bulbs for a lower-calorie alternative to mashed potatoes. Large portions of the bulbs should be cut and boiled until soft. After draining the water, mash the celery root until it resembles mashed potatoes.